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Page 22 | 16 - 29 October 2019 Resident Matters BILLY’S PATCH: Our man in Golden Lane, Billy Mann, explains how the estate’s residents are doing their bit to preserve the rich and varied history of his patch city_matters CITYMATTERS.LONDON RESIDENTS TAKE A LOOK BACK TO BETTER KNOW WHERE THEY ARE GOING THE Barbican’s 50th birthday events went off with a bang, unlike Golden Lane’s 60th, which slipped by quietly. Back in 1959, the estate was still being built. It wasn’t finished until 1962 with the completion of Crescent House, but by then residents of Cuthbert Harrowing and Bowater Houses were already veterans. There are documents showing what stood before Chamberlin, Powell and Bon laid down the architectural fingerprint that would spawn two of London’s most admired modern housing projects. This was an area of terraced streets and small manufacturing firms. It was all smashed to smithereens during the German bombing of London in 1940-41 and Golden Lane – and later the Barbican – estates are what grew out of that dark moment in history. Collection Some of this history went on display recently at St Giles church as part of the @barbican50 activities, including displays from the historical groups ‘A London Inheritance’ and ‘Tales of Cripplegate’, but the ‘People’s Story’ is still a work in progress. Residents from that first wave of post-war regeneration of London are alive and well here on Golden Lane. They are our treasured seniors, keepers of the golden memories. They are good company, and some of them have even loaned me their private photos and memorabilia to record and exhibit as part of a Golden Lane Estate community archive. The collection is far from complete, but has gained the support of the Barbican Archive, who have kindly invited me to display items and chat about the collection at the upcoming Barbican Archive Residency Weekend (19-20 October). This is a packed, family-friendly free two days of displays, workshops, films and pop-up installations. It will also feature the Barbican Archive Jukebox, a fun way to listen to a collection of audio-visual histories, including one by me about Golden Lane, in which I am Legal & public notices Notice of application to vary a Premises Licence under Section 34 of the Licensing Act 2003 Notice is hereby given that Fuller, Smith & Turner Plc in respect of Premises known as Chamberlains Hotel, 130-135 The Minories, London, EC3N 1NU applied to City of London Corporation for a Variation of a Premises Licence. The proposed variation is: 1. Extend alcohol and late night refreshment until 02:00 7 days a week. 2. Extend closing hours until 02:30 7 days a week. 3. To add live music from 23:00 until 02:00 7 days a week in the basement only. 4. To add conditions as agreed with the Police. All other licensable activities, permitted hours, opening hours and conditions to remain as existing. Any representations regarding the above-mentioned application must be received in writing by Licensing Authority, City of London Licensing Authority, Markets and Consumer Protection, PO Box 270, Guildhall, EC2P 2EJ, no later than 31st October 2019 stating the grounds for representation. The register of City of London Corporation and the record of the application may be inspected at the address of the council, given above, during normal business hours or on the council’s website - www.cityoflondon.gov.uk It is an offence knowingly or recklessly to make a false statement in connection with an application. A person is liable to an unlimited fine on conviction should such a false statement be made. Poppleston Allen 37 Stoney Street, The Lace Market, Nottingham, NG1 1LS Heartbeats of heritage embarrassingly pictured as a Roman soldier. Citizen’s lives are the heartbeat of heritage for the Barbican and Golden Lane estates, and Barbican Archive are keen to enrich their collection and urge residents and workers past and present to bring themselves, their stories, their photographs and their experiences to add to the project. The archives currently hold dozens of photographs of the devastated landscape this area became overnight on 10-11 May 1941. What they have yet to record are the memories of living people who actually stood on the Notice of application for the grant of a Premises Licence under Section 17 of the Licensing Act 2003 Notice is hereby given that Wagamama Group Limited has applied to City of London Corporation for the grant of a Premises Licence in respect of Premises to be known as Mamago, Unit 1, Fencourt, 120 Fenchurch Street, London, EC3M 5BA. The proposed licensable activities and their hours are: Sale of alcohol from 07:00 to 22:00 hours, seven days a week; Recorded music from 07:00 to 22:00 hours, seven days a week; Opening hours from 07:00 to 22:30 hours, seven days a week. Any representations regarding the above-mentioned application must be received in writing by Licensing Authority, City of London Licensing Authority, Markets and Consumer Protection, PO Box 270, Guildhall, EC2P 2EJ no later than 6th November 2019 stating the grounds for representation. The register of City of London Corporation and the record of the application may be inspected at the address of the council, given above, during normal business hours or on the council’s website - www.cityoflondon.gov.uk It is an offence knowingly or recklessly to make a false statement in connection with an application. A person is liable to an unlimited fine on conviction should such a false statement be made. Poppleston Allen The Stanley Building, 7 Pancras Square, London, N1C 4AG scorched earth and tasted the smoke. An invitation appeared on our notice boards recently. It looked to be from an Extinction Rebel, asking us to join a talk in the Sir Ralph Perring Centre about ecology and the climate emergency. Free tea and biscuits were promised. It was an unconventional invitation – handwritten, neat, but no spelling mistakes or crossings-out. But it didn’t say who it was from, or even if they were an estate resident. It was a mystery. Native Some suspicious residents believed it to be the handiwork of a cunning criminal fishing for naive victims. Others were intrigued enough to attend. It turned out to be from a Crescent House resident known for her passionate views. And in an hour-long electric rainstorm of eco facts and figures she told us how man and planet had drifted so far apart that the only way now to avoid population extinction is to change everything we do. It came with so much energy that the whole of the room seemed to be running on power generated by the people sat in it. Maybe that was the idea. Being a native Liverpool supporter stuck in the middle of an estate full of Arsenal fans is a cross I have carried for too long, so I recently decided to find a London team to cheer. I was courted by a few lonely Golden Laners from both the Tottenham and Chelsea tribes, and I do have a fondness for Leyton Orient, but none of these felt quite right. So I have elected City of London FC (established 1931) as my team. Not the senior team, though, who play in the Southern Amateur League (SAL). Their home ground is in Catford, whereas the CoL FC youth wing train round the corner and play their games across the road from the City’s York Way Estate in Islington. I recently got to see the U9s (Under Nines) play Hackney Borough and the U10s play Hill (from Primrose Hill). In the U10 contest Hill proved to be strong and disciplined. Their second goal came after a dubious handball (with screams of VAR from adult spectators) and from then on they hit a confident stride. CoL were unlucky not to recover after an early setback, and the eventual 4-0 defeat was not a good reflection of the work they put in. Hard work did, however, pay off for CoL U9s and they snatched a miracle winner seconds from the final whistle to make the scoreline 3-2. I punched the air and knew instantly I’d found my London team. Billy Mann lives in Basterfield House on the Golden Lane Estate. He is a teaching assistant, a City of London Community Builder and a blogger. Write to him at [email protected] taking action: residents convened to discuss climate change

CITYMATTERS.LONDON citymatters 16 - 29 October 2019 | Page 23 Resident Matters IT SEEMS BAD THINGS COME IN THREES FOR BARBICAN ESTATE RESIDENTS HEL’S CORNER: Barbican resident and City Matters contributor, Helen Hudson, brings us up to date on a number of pressing issues facing members of the estate THERE is no warm and fluffy this month, I’m so sorry. I have three calls to action this week for anyone who cares about our Barbican Estate. The first is the ongoing City of London School for Girls expansion project (including the plan to fill in under Mountjoy, scratch out our architectural heritage and turn it into a massive school restaurant). Just as an aside, let’s try and not be lured into a state of complacency by the word ‘expansion’. This proposal is huge; ‘football pitch’ huge. We had expected the formal planning application to be in progress by now. The school laid out their expected timeline earlier this year with September pegged as the time for the planning application to be submitted. Personally, I had been looking forward to the application so we could at least have had some closure. The application has not been submitted even now. At meetings, it is not clear why there is a delay to their application. I can imagine that Mountjoy residents are on tenterhooks and, yet again, face another Christmas tainted by stress. What a form of torture that the school is engaging in by dragging out the pain of uncertainty inflicted on their closest neighbours. Campaign As with any campaign where the applicant drags things out, the opposition must sustain the energy for the fight. You may have noticed the SOS Barbican balcony banners going up. The Barbican Estate Office soon swooped in and ordered residents to remove them but, while they are up, they re-ignite the flame against this development. If you haven’t already, then please support your neighbours by: 1. Signing the petition on sosbarbican.com – it only takes a few seconds. 2. We also ask residents to complete a survey. It’s only four questions so also quick to do (and might make all the difference). 3. Write to Catherine McGuinness, the chair of the policy and resources committee of the City of London (which is one of the most powerful positions in the City). Even a short email of a couple of sentences would help. 4. If you work in the City, write to the Common Councillors who represent the ward in which your employer is based. Everything you need to know is on the website sosbarbican.com, but if you have any problems, then please reach out to me, or to the Barbican Association or your House Group. Every new voice which joins the campaign strengthens our case against the scheme. The second call to action is on the third application from the Barbican Centre to install huge illuminated lighting on Defoe Place outside Defoe House bedrooms. Shakespeare Tower suffers, too. Thoughtfully, the City has notified some of the original Re-energising residents for fight on all fronts objectors and told them to take another look. Tweaks have been made to the application and we might change our minds? We have only 21 days from the notification to re-inform our local residents affected and re-energise for the third time, so we’re on a mission – yet again. The planning application is 18/00335/LBC, and I urge everyone close to Defoe Place to take a look as soon as possible and add objections. The existing sign is iconic and also works fine for direction finding. It does not need to be lit. Furthermore, it should not be possible to keep resubmitting the same application with relatively small changes with the obvious Legal & public notices flying the flag: frustrated locals have shown their displeasure at plans to make changes to the Barbican Estate strategy of just trying to sneak it through quickly and under the radar. Andrewes House Residents, please take note: our third call to action is on a new application by Telefonica to build some 5G antennae on the high floors of London Wall Place. One section of the application regards the guidelines for public exposure and the application points out that there are no schools nearby, so nothing to worry about there. There are, however, residents. It is really difficult to see from the plans how far away these antennae are going to sit from our flats, so we can either trust their (not provided) calculations on health and safety, or object to their lack of transparency. We have until 23 October to comment. This is application 19/01007/DPAR if you would like to take a closer look. You can reach the City’s Planning website on planning2.cityoflondon.gov.uk. The next Barbican Association (BA) meeting will be held on 14 November, and the next Residents Consultation Committee (RCC) meeting on 2 December. If you have any spare time, please get involved with your House Group and the Barbican Association. We are always looking for new volunteers and there is lots to keep us all busy. Please get in touch if you need any more information.

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