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Your weekly puzzle

Your weekly puzzle challenge CROSS CODE 26 17 4 19 4 9 26 4 3 22 13 12 23 10 24 10 6 7 14 11 9 6 10 24 13 5 10 5 1 2 12 4 23 4 22 10 10 22 17 13 26 10 7 15 1 6 10 4 10 20 5 13 24 10 13 18 10 14 18 5 1 18 25 4 5 10 22 7 20 5 18 18 10 4 7 9 24 24 4 10 8 17 13 14 4 9 18 10 10 18 17 16 17 15 14 2 2 1 10 13 6 10 4 18 9 6 10 5 9 24 18 10 13 24 4 22 10 21 10 20 5 10 22 22 ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 N E 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Each number in our Cross Code grid represents a different letter of the alphabet. You have three letters in the control grid to start you off. Enter them in the appropriate squares in the main grid, then use your knowledge of words to work out which letters should go in the missing squares. As you get the letters, fill in other squares with the same number in the main grid and control grid. Check off the alphabetical list of letters as you identify them. MAGIC SQUARE SHE HIRES LARGE PIG Using all 16 letters of the phrase above, form four words each of four letters which will fit in the grid to form a magic square in which the words can be read both horizontally and vertically. SUDOKU Easy S 9 4 3 5 2 1 4 9 6 8 7 3 5 1 6 6 7 4 1 8 6 2 7 8 3 8 4 3 5 2 8 9 NONAGRAM How many words of four letters or more can you make from this Nonagram? Each word must use the central letter, and each letter may be used only once. At least one word using all nine letters can be found. Guidelines: 18 Good; 22 Very Good; 25 Excellent. Any word found in the Concise Oxford Dictionary (Tenth Edition) is eligible with the following exceptions: proper nouns; plural nouns, pronouns and possessives; third person singular verbs; hyphenated words; contractions and abbreviations; vulgar slang words; variant spellings of the same word (where another variant is also eligible). Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1 to 9, and so must each 3 x 3 box. Quiz Challenge 1. Tamzin Outhwaite is known for playing Mel Owen in which TV soap opera? 2. Which European football club plays at the Camp Nou Stadium? 3. Which English king lost his only legitimate son by drowning in 1120? 4. The writer Charles Lutwidge Dodgson adopted what pen name? 5. What name is given to the molten rock which normally lies under the earth’s crust? E E L D E B V R E WORD PYRAMID Spell out a 15-letter word or phrase by moving from one chamber to another within the pyramid. You may only enter each of the chambers once and may only proceed through openings in the walls. The first letter may appear in any chamber. FIVE ALIVE 2 6 7 9 3 3 4 2 1 6 8 3 9 4 7 9 1 4 6 3 5 5 6 4 9 1 6. What is the English equivalent of the American game tic-tactoe? 7. What controversial structure was erected outside the Louvre museum in Paris in 1989? 8. How many holes does a tenpin bowling ball have? 9. Which FI motor racing team was owned by Bernie Ecclestone from 1972 to 1987? 10. In which film did Robin Williams disguise himself as a children’s nanny? DA NR AT IW LC Hard B MI RN RO AG LA VI EB IL IS IE LM ST EA LR GL YE E W T E O A R P T H T S E H Here are two miniature fivesquare crosswords using the same grid – but the letters have been mixed up. You have to work out which letters belong to which crossword. EQUALISER 14 10 6 2 5 2 8 12 3 3 4 5 Place the four signs (add, subtract, multiply, divide) one in each circle so that the total of each across and down line is the same. Perform the first calculation in each line first and ignore the mathematical law which says you should always perform division and multiplication before addition and subtraction. This puzzle page is supplied by Sirius Media Services Ltd. To try our new puzzle, Zygolex, go to www.zygolex.com © Sirius Media Services Ltd CRYPTIC CROSSWORD 1 8 9 11 16 20 22 10 2 12 11 17 21 ACROSS 1. American animal will roll a maid over (9) 6. By which it’s stuck (3) 8. It’s neither here nor there (9,4) 9. This bird gets the boot (5) 10. Some attend lessons that are interminable (7) 11. Company of actors or scouts, say (6) 13. He makes reparations near to disaster (6) 16. Child, a daughter of the King of Spain (7) 18. Meals produced at an old city (5) 20. Unimportance in effect (13) 22. Damage by graduate, rebel leader (3) 23. Long drink? A very long one! (4,2,3) 1 8 12 18 26 29 21 2 16 19 13 3 17 23 3 11 20 28 15 9 4 10 15 21 25 13 13 16 DOWN QUICK CROSSWORD 5 14 18 6 19 7 21 1. Fool may succeed, but not quietly (3) 2. Acted, but did not say a word (5) 3. Small amount of morning water (7) 4. Another elder accepts one of the German songs (6) 5. Nymph has nothing to study (5) 6. Everyone’s gone wild around the ship (7) 7. Smart mole disturbed in great confusion (9) 9. Clever remark from comedian Tim thus coming up inside (9) 12. One in authority and where he may work by right (7) 14. Ted’s out to collect Roman military item (7) 15. Way of progressing through life is to gallop (6) 17. Simpleton finds hotel in New York (5) 19. Girl gets lad in trouble (5) 21. Lady of the night (3) 4 8 10 14 17 22 22 27 30 5 23 15 6 24 26 7 25 SOLUTIONS 31 32 NONAGRAM: bedel; beer; BELVEDERE; bevel; bled; bleed; bleeder; bred; breed; breve; deer; dele; delve; delver; derv; dree; elder; elver; ever; leer; leered; levee; lever; levered; rebel; rede; reed; reel; reeled; reeve; reeved; revel; veer; veered; veld; verb. Across – Drawl; Gavel; Tally. Down – Digit; Anvil; Lolly. Across – Antic; Alibi; Serge. Down – Amass; Trier; Crime. (2) FIVE ALIVE: (1) QUICK CROSSWORD: Across – 1 Caster; 4 Shut up; 8 Nearer; 10 Twinge; 11 Lazed; 12 Plumes; 14 Satire; 16 Path; 17 Thin; 19 Disc; 22 Idea; 26 Treaty; 27 Derive; 28 Usher; 29 Cravat; 30 Single; 31 Ornate; 32 Kennel. Down – 1 Canopy; 2 Slap-up; 3 Eyelet; 5 Howdah; 6 Tannin; 7 Prefer; 9 Rash; 10 Test; 13 Mafia; 15 Tiger; 18 Stucco; 19 Detain; 20 Stuart; 21 Cyst; 22 Ides; 23 Deride; 24 Air-gun; 25 Cereal. CRYPTIC CROSSWORD: Across – 1 Armadillo; 6 Gum; 8 Somewhere else; 9 Wader; 10 Endless; 11 Troupe; 13 Atoner; 16 Infanta; 18 Salem; 20 Inconsequence; 22 Mar; 23 Yard of ale. Down – 1 Ass; 2 Mimed; 3 Dewdrop; 4 Lieder; 5 Oread; 6 Galleon; 7 Maelstrom; 9 Witticism; 12 Officer; 14 Testudo; 15 Career; 17 Ninny; 19 Linda; 21 Eve. A EQUALISER: Clockwise from top left – multiply; subtract; add; divide. Total: 7. WORD PYRAMID: The powers that be. W MAGIC SQUARE: prig; rash; isle; ghee. 26 13 Z M 25 12 R X 24 11 P E 23 10 5 4 2 7 9 6 3 8 1 6 7 9 1 3 8 4 5 2 1 3 8 5 4 2 7 6 9 2 5 1 6 7 4 8 9 3 3 8 6 9 2 1 5 4 7 7 9 4 3 8 5 1 2 6 8 1 7 4 6 9 2 3 5 9 2 5 8 1 3 6 7 4 4 6 3 2 5 7 9 1 8 D O 22 9 J Q 21 8 C I 20 7 K V 19 6 S T 18 5 9 4 3 6 5 2 8 7 1 7 2 8 3 1 4 5 6 9 5 1 6 9 8 7 2 3 4 3 5 1 2 6 8 4 9 7 6 8 9 7 4 1 3 2 5 2 7 4 5 9 3 6 1 8 4 6 2 1 7 5 9 8 3 8 9 7 4 3 6 1 5 2 1 3 5 8 2 9 7 4 6 EASY SUDOKU HARD SUDOKU U N 17 4 F B 16 G Y 15 L H 14 CROSS CODE 1 2 3 QUIZ CHALLENGE: 1 EastEnders; 2 Barcelona; 3 Henry I; 4 Lewis Carroll; 5 Magma; 6 Noughts and crosses; 7 A glass pyramid; 8 Three; 9 Brabham; 10 Mrs Doubtfire. ACROSS 1. Swivelling wheel (6) 4. Confined (4,2) 8. Closer (6) 10. Sudden pain (6) 11. Idled (5) 12. Feathers (6) 14. Irony (6) 16. Track (4) 17. Lean (4) 19. Flat plate (4) 22. Notion (4) 26. Pact (6) 27. Originate from (6) 28. Escort (5) 29. Neckwear (6) 30. Unmarried (6) 31. Decorated (6) 32. Dog shelter (6) DOWN 1. Awning (6) 2. Lavish (inf.) (4-2) 3. Hole for cord (6) 5. Elephant seat (6) 6. Substance found in wine (6) 7. Favour (6) 9. Skin eruption (4) 10. Examine (4) 13. Criminal organisation (5) 15. Large feline (5) 18. Type of plaster (6) 19. Keep behind (6) 20. English royal house (6) 21. Blister (4) 22. ---- of March (4) 23. Mock (6) 24. Weapon (3-3) 25. Edible grain (6)

CITYMATTERS.LONDON 05 - 18 February 2020 | Page 21 RESIDENT OPINION subscribe to our newsletter at citymatters.london I start this week’s column by serving myself a large slice of humble pie. In my last column, I lamented the fact that Sanctuary, the wonderful sculpture by Naomi Blake, appeared to have been forgotten about when the churchyard of St Botolph Without Aldgate was recently regenerated, writes Ian McPherson. However, I need to clarify that I’ve subsequently learned I was wrong about this. Blake, who died in 2018, was a survivor of the holocaust. Sent to Auschwitz as a young woman, she lost many of her family to genocide. After the war, she started making sculptures as a cathartic means by which to address the awful trauma she’d witnessed and endured at the hands of the Nazis. Sanctuary is one such piece. The photograph accompanying my article showed how Sanctuary had been moved from its previous location near the main entrance to the church and is now looking somewhat redundant propped up against a wall by the fire exit of the church hall. It appears, however, that my conclusions were rather hasty and premature. After reading my piece, I was contacted by the Reverend Laura Jørgenson, the Rector of St Botolph’s. Laura was very keen to stress that plans are very much afoot to have Sanctuary permanently re-sited in the church’s north churchyard once some planning-related matters have been resolved with the appropriate authorities. The sculpture’s current storage by the church hall’s fire escape is therefore temporary. This is fantastic news, and I’d like to take this opportunity to apologise to the Rector for mistakenly suggesting that Sanctuary had perhaps been overlooked when the churchyard was recently modernised. This is evidently not the case, and I am more than happy to take this opportunity to put the record straight. Indeed, Laura informs me that the church is even planning to be part of a Naomi Blakethemed walk this summer which is being organised by the artist’s daughter. Plans are still being firmed up, but I’ll be sure to let you all know more details as I get them. Significantly, this month marks the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz by the Red Army. I am happy to be able to clarify to everyone that Portsoken’s own commemoration to the victims of the unspeakable evil that happened there, and indeed to all victims of oppression, is in safe hands. Borough of culture “successful beyond our wildest dreams” LONDON’S first Borough of Culture was “successful beyond our wildest dreams”, the Deputy Mayor for Culture has said, writes Jessie Mathewson, Local Democracy Reporter. Justine Simons said Waltham Forest delivered on a “bold vision and ambition” that benefitted residents and the city as a whole. The borough received £1.35million funding from the Mayor’s office last year to hold festivals, theatre, art and community shows. There were over 1,000 events, attended by more than half a million people, and every school in the borough was involved – a total of 88. At the 10 biggest gatherings, visitors spent £4.1 – and 70% of creative businesses reported an increase in revenue. Ms Simons said: “Waltham Forest as Borough of Culture has been successful beyond our wildest dreams. It’s shown that culture isn’t just for people in Zone One. It’s for all sectors of society. It’s for absolutely everyone.” She added: “This was a bold idea for London – but we’ve tested it out and we’re really happy with what’s happened. It’s tremendously successful as a flagship for London.” The Local Democracy Service previously reported that less than a quarter of Londoners knew about the new scheme, according to a YouGov poll last year. But Ms Simons said within the borough 78% of residents were aware of the programme by the end of the year – up from 60%. She added: “It’s a brand new scheme so we’re starting from a baseline of zero.” Lorna Lee, assistant director of culture and heritage at the borough council, said: “Waltham Forest didn’t start off with a blank sheet of paper. “Culture was already recognised as being a really important means of improving the quality of life in the borough and boosting the local economy.” Ms Lee said it gave the borough “a chance to boost what we were doing, to put a spotlight on Waltham Forest and to give everyone a real opportunity to demonstrate what an outer London borough could do for its residents and for London as a whole.” Brent is this year’s Borough of Culture, and hosted its opening ceremony outside Wembley stadium earlier this month. Phil Porter, strategic director of community wellbeing at the council, said the 2020 programme aimed to put the borough on the map. He said: “People don’t know where Brent is often – they know Wembley, but they might not know Kilburn, they might not know Alperton, and all the others places in Brent. “So people actually wanting to tell the story of Brent was very strong and passionate.” SANCTUARY AFTER ALL Contact us for all your last minute printing orders letterpress lithographic digital SOCIAL ENTERPRISE PRINTING Ltd Traditional Printing with a Social Value 12 Pinchin St, London E1 1SA [email protected] 020 7488 9800

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